THEGREENGROK

Pictures at an Oil Rig Explosion


by Bill Chameides | May 12th, 2010
posted by Erica Rowell (Editor)

Permalink | 3 comments

The oil rig disaster from a distance.

Photos of the disaster from an anonymous source in the oil industry. Take a gander.

For me these eerily beautiful images of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster echo the gestalt of the entire event.

With the parties involved in the operation of the oil rig busily pointing fingers of blame elsewhere, we are left to look on from a distance — helpless but transfixed, as we watch the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico spread, as we absorb the environmental disaster as it plays itself out.

View slide show.

Deepwater Horizon sister rigThe Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of MexicoThe Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico

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filed under: ecosystems, faculty, fossil fuels, oceans, oil, pollution
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3 Comments

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  1. Don Lazaroe
    Jun 2, 2010

    Dr. Chameides, Thank you for your concern about the effects this spill will have on the environments along the Gulf Coast, especially the Louisiana Coast as I am from there. Along with whatever environmental research you and the University may decide to look into, is this incident something that Duke’s School of Engineering may also look into in an attempt to see if they can develop a device that would assist in these types of incidents? While the Gulf of Mexico has experienced numerous “spills” over the years, nothing of this magnitude has ever happened especially at the depths we are currently talking about, and as long as we continue to “deep water” drill, chances are it will happen again. We, as a Country, must come up with something that can be used in “deep water” drilling incidents to quickly “cap”, “trap” or at least curb the amount of oil that is leaked into the surrounding waters. Thanks for your time.

  2. Bill Chameides
    Jun 1, 2010

    We’ve got some coastal projects cookin’; stay tuned. And the Cape Hatteras research vessel we manage at the Duke Marine Lab will be headed to the gulf shortly.

  3. Lee E. Faber
    May 26, 2010

    Are your faculty setting up to study the effects of the spill?

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