Nicholas School Blogs

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Birding Without Borders vs. Birding My Backyard

grey catbird and tiger swallowtail

Recently an adventurous spirit has captured my attention. Every day around noon, I log on to the Audubon website and look for the daily update from Noah Strycker, a 28 year old birder who is trying to see 5,000 species of birds in one year. Given that there are around 10,000 species, that means he aims to see half of all bird species in just 365 days. Exhausting? Yes. Crazy? Yes. Impressive? Yes. And he has inspired me to continue my birding and up my game.

Lessons from Hispaniola

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  I took this photo looking out the back window of a jeep, snapping it hurriedly on my camera a […]

It All Comes Out in the Wash?

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"No-poo" has become a trending alternative to using commercial shampoos. People have many reasons for turning to alternative hair washing options, and one of these is the fact that most of our shampoo ingredients will eventually end up in the environment from either treated wastewater or biosolids. So I decided to try no-poo for myself, but the experience was less simple than I'd imagined.

Afghanistan: Enforcement Issues

Facebook cover photo of the Kabul Police Headquarters.

Police forces all over the world have been in the news in the past few weeks, even in Afghanistan. A […]

Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary: Restoration for Humans and Marine Life

Over famous fish sandwiches at the Islamorada Fish Company and Market in the Florida Keys, I and 10 […]

Citizen Science and eButterfly

Common Buckeye. Photo by Erika Zambello

I'm already an avid user of eBird, a website and app that allow birders from all over the world to record their data, while simultaneously providing a wealth if data to scientists and conservationists. Given it's importance as a citizen science project, I was thrilled to discover eButterfly, a more recent project with the same goals. Over the winter break I took some time to identify a few of my butterfly photos, and record my first observation.

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