Marine Conservation Biology in Hawaii

Second full day on Midway: slide show
by -- January 22nd, 2012

Some photos of our second full day on Midway.

Touring the history of the island via bicycles, we stop to consider the the day Midway was bombed, December 7, 1941 (the same day as Pearl Harbor).

Touring the history of the island via bicycles, we stop to consider the the day Midway was bombed, December 7, 1941 (the same day as Pearl Harbor).

CEM Caitlyn Zimmerman being a rascal, tempted to push buttons on old generators.

CEM Caitlyn Zimmerman being a rascal, tempted to push buttons on old generators.

CEM Kristen Maize checking out the old generators.

CEM Kristen Maize checking out the old generators.

CEM Pati Villegas sneaking out to take a photo. It's irresistible!

CEM Pati Villegas sneaking out to take a photo. It's irresistible!

A Laysan and Black-Footed Albatross take a nap together.

A Laysan and Black-Footed Albatross take a nap together.

Unfortunately not all eggs and chicks survive.

Unfortunately not all eggs and chicks survive.

Some albatross like to sit back on their heels.

Some albatross like to sit back on their heels.

Here a Laysan Albatross and a Laysan Duck chill together. Laysan Ducks can be found near fresh water sources and at one point reached a bottleneck of only 11 animals. Today they are doing very well on Midway.

Here a Laysan Albatross and a Laysan Duck chill together. Laysan Ducks can be found near fresh water sources and at one point reached a bottleneck of only 11 animals. Today they are doing very well on Midway.

Here's the face of a very irritated Laysan Albatross.

Here's the face of a very irritated Laysan Albatross.

A white-tailed tropicbird flies through the iron wood trees.

A white-tailed tropicbird flies through the iron wood trees.

Now for a close-up of a black-footed albatross.

Now for a close-up of a black-footed albatross.

Black-Footed Albatross on its nest.

Black-Footed Albatross on its nest.

Canaries were introduced to Midway by the manager of the cable companies that used to inhabit this island. There were cage birds, but as often happens with cage birds, they escaped!

Canaries were introduced to Midway by the manager of the cable companies that used to inhabit this island. There were cage birds, but as often happens with cage birds, they escaped!

Albatross will nest anywhere.

Albatross will nest anywhere.

Along Cargo Pier the habitat of the albatross looks vastly different to the bunch grass, beach morning glory, and white sand that we're used to. Here invasive iron wood trees and the dreaded woody shrub verbacina reign.

Along Cargo Pier the habitat of the albatross looks vastly different to the bunch grass, beach morning glory, and white sand that we're used to. Here invasive iron wood trees and the dreaded woody shrub verbacina reign.

Here lies a dead albatross, with a stomach full of plastic out on Cargo Pier. While Dr. Hyrenbach at Hawaii Pacific University told us that there is no direct link between ingesting plastic and death, we all think these animals should not have to have stomachs full of plastic as a matter of course.

Here lies a dead albatross, with a stomach full of plastic out on Cargo Pier. While Dr. Hyrenbach at Hawaii Pacific University told us that there is no direct link between ingesting plastic and death, we all think these animals should not have to have stomachs full of plastic as a matter of course.

This fairy tern seems to be totally zonked out, feathers fluffed up to help keep it warm.

This fairy tern seems to be totally zonked out, feathers fluffed up to help keep it warm.

Whoops, it spotted me!

Whoops, it spotted me!

This fairy tern has a small flying fish in its mouth. Guess it's waiting to eat until its mate comes back!

This fairy tern has a small flying fish in its mouth. Guess it's waiting to eat until its mate comes back!

On our second day on Midway we toured more of the history, as well as restoring some of the land. For more on the history and restoration, see Kristen’s post.

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